Passages

 

Passages Essay Tasks Samples

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On Hills Like White Elephants

A "Hills" Forum

Passages on Symbolism and Theme

General Directions:  Review the passages on one of the 10 lists linked via the buttons above and to make notes on any pattern you find in the passages listed. If you can work in a group to discuss these patterns, set your purpose to build a thesis that could be used on the essay that ends this module.  Each pattern of symbolism or theme may suggest a thesis for your essay.

NOTE: The page numbers on the pages that follow refer to one specific edition of A Farewell to Arms, but they can still be indicators helpful in finding suggested passages.  The edition used was ISBN 684-71797-2, a paperback edition with a 5 1/2" x 8" trim size, similar to the hardbound editions.  Students who have used other editions of the novel have determined algorithms for the number of pages their edition differs from this one (the numbers get larger or smaller deeper into the book).
Book Chapters Page Numbers in This Edition
1 1-12 1 - 78
2 13-24 81-159
3 25-32 163-233
4 33-37 237-285
5 38-41 289-332

 

1. Look over each passage list to see the assigned tasks.

2. Pick the passage list that you wish to study with a group.

3. Declare that selection.

4. Prepare your notes before the group meets.

5. Help group members to design at least one thesis based on the evidence in the listed passages.  If time permits, groups working on similar topics should meet together.

6. Make sure your group reports its thesis statements to the teacher at the end of the assigned class discussion--and that each member of group has a copy of these thesis ideas.

7. Decide whether to use a thesis from the group discussion or a suggested thesis from the sample list.

8. Plan your essay-writing-and-revising process to finish by the deadline set by your teacher.  Reports of group findings to the class can be done orally if time allows.

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Copyright3.gif (24311 bytes)Copyright and Permission: This web on Ernest Hemingway's early novel was begun under a small grant from the VCCS, which holds copyright.  2001 by the Virginia Community College System.  This web was made by Dr. Eric Hibbison, Professor of English and Chief Chair, VCCS Regional Centers for Teaching Excellence (1998-2002). Materials in this web may be used free for educational purposes, but this web should not be behind a portal for which users must pay a fee without written permission from the VCCS.  If you're an educator using this web, please inform ehibbison@jsr.vccs.edu, especially if you'd like contact with other educators who are using this web.